Posts by Nick Trehearne:

Camping near Prince George is something everyone should experience. Whether you’re looking for a full hook up site, or a remote bush camping experience, the options are endless. Although there are far too many great locations to cover in a short article, I will highlight three of my favourites. These three locations share one main trait – awe inspiring beauty.

Purden Lake

     Purden Lake is one of the more popular destinations around Prince George for camping. It has everything from a georgeous lake for fishing and swimming, to a hiking trail system where you’re bound to see spectacular views or even some of the resident wildlife.

     Located 64km east of Prince George, this location is ideal for a night’s stay if you’re just passing through, or are looking for somewhere to stay for an extended visit. The campground features 78 sites, of which 12 are tent only sites. Reservations are available online to secure your favorite spot in advance, but for the last minute traveler, there are also first come, first serve spots available.

Whiskers Point Provincial Park

     Even though this location is a little bit further from Prince George, Whiskers Point Provincial Park should not be overlooked. Located approximately 100km north from the outskirts of the city, this is an ideal location for people heading north on towards the Alaska Highway. 

     This park is equipped with everything from horseshoe pits to volleyball nets and is sure to have something suitable for the whole family. One of the best parts though, is the sheltered sandy beach – the perfect place for a mid-day swim, or just relaxing in the sun.

     There are 59 sites available at this campground with running water in the facilities nearby. Similar to Purden Lake, there are both reservation as well as first come first serve sites available.

Rec Sites near Francis Lake

     For the campers looking to enjoy a more rustic, remote setting, there are rec sites scattered throughout the area. One of the most beautiful areas to enjoy is the rec sites near Francis Lake, which is located roughly 40 kilometers south east of Prince George.

     Not only is there a great rec site at Francis Lake, but there are also 8 other rec sites in the area to choose from – most of which, are also waterfront on the shores of other nearby lakes and rivers.

      These rec sites are located in remote areas and are strictly on a first come first serve basis, so be sure to have a back-up plan in place in the event that they are full upon your arrival. These sites have no services, but there is endless opportunity for the ATV enthusiast or outdoors person to be able to go right from the front door of your tent or trailer.

      Although these three locations don’t even begin to touch on the amount of camping opportunity in the area, no matter what the type of amenities you’re searching for, you will be able to find just the place near Prince George. Trailers, tents, full hook up, or remote – you name it, you’ll find it.

info@nicktrehearne.com
www.nicktrehearne.com

Copyright N. Trehearne 2015

Top 3 Snowshoe locations around Prince George, BC

     When it comes to locations for winter activity around Prince George, especially snowshoeing, the possibilities are endless. With a maze of trails that can be accessed both within the city limits, as well as in the surrounding areas, it can be difficult to choose the best place to hit the trail.

     There are both private and public options for snowshoeing venues nearby. The most popular option for a private venue is the Caledonia Nordic Ski Club. This is a non-profit organization, but there is fees to use their trails.

     As far as the public options go, although there are many, there is three main trails (or trail systems) that come to mind when I think of great locations to get out in nature.

Eskers Provincial Park

     Eskers is a great beginner / intermediate location for snowshoeing near Prince George. With 15 kilometers of marked trails, you can do anything from a quick 20 minute walk with the kids, to an all day excursion, exploring all of the trails that Eskers offers.

     The trails weave through the numerous lakes and marshes that make up the park. Often in this pristine habitat, you will even be lucky enough to come across some of the local wildlife such as grouse or moose. While snowshoeing is one of the highlights of winter in this particular park, there is no track setting.

Crooked River Provincial Park

     This park can be found north of Prince George, just south of Bear Lake.  While in the summertime this park consists of a popular campground, during the winter the gates are closed at the highway. Luckily, this is part of what makes it great for snowshoeing! Not only is there marked trails throughout the park, but you can also embark down any of the road systems that navigate throughout.

     For shorter ventures, the bear lake trail around the main lake is quite popular, but if you are ambitious and feeling up for a bit longer jaunt, the square lake trail takes on a large loop which then joins up with the crooked river trail to take you back to the main (bear) lake.

     Similar to Eskers there is no track setting in this park as well, although this is also a popular destination so it is usually not an issue.

Viking Ridge

     Viking ridge is, by far, the most technical of the three locations. This should only be considered my advanced people since it is a very steep trail and takes you above treeline on to a mountain ridge.

     The views that you obtain on this trail are second to none. You can see a full 360 degree view of all the surrounding, low lying, areas. The trail starts with a steep ascent through the forest which takes you to an open meadow. From there, you climb higher to a small lake, and then finally on to the ridge.

     The Viking ridge trail is not track set, and although there is flagging on the way up to help you navigate, it is not recommended for unexperienced outdoors people.

     For both Eskers and Crooked River, detailed trail maps can be found online at the BC Parks website (www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks). For Viking ridge, information can be obtained through the Caledonia Ramblers website (www.caledoniaramblers.ca).

     Whether you choose to embark on a venture to one of these locations, or just find one on your own, you are sure to experience nature at its finest around Prince George. After all, is there such a thing as a bad day when you are in the great outdoors with snowshoes strapped to your feet?

info@nicktrehearne.com
www.nicktrehearne.com

Copyright N. Trehearne 2015
 

Subscribe to our Newsletter:

Want to keep up on the latest and greatest in PG? Sign up for our e-mail newsletter below:

Video Blogs:

What is the MRDT? Overview The Municipal and Regional District Tax (MRDT) was introduced in 1987...
View All Video Blogs

Recent Posts:

Categories:

Cultural Access Pass:

The Institute for Canadian Citizens' Cultural Access Pass allows newly sworn-in citizens to visit participating attractions for free, for one year.

Institute for Canadian Citizenship - Cultural Access Pass

Find out how to register for free access to over 1,200 of Canada's best museums, art galleries, discovery centres, historic sites and nature parks - then pick yours up at our visitor centre!

Coupons:

Click Here for Coupons

Loading